Frequently Asked Questions

What is a CCC-SLP?

How do I know if my child needs speech therapy?

What happens at an Evaluation?

What happens during therapy?

How do I know if speech therapy is covered by my insurance?

My child receives speech therapy at school. Should they have additional services?


What is a CCC-SLP?

SLP stands for Speech-Language Pathologist. SLP’s must have earned Master’s degrees from a University program which has been accredited by ASHA (the American Speech and Hearing Association). Along with required coursework, Master’s degree students complete 400 hours in a clinical setting, working as speech therapists in training.

Once a Master’s degree (including the clinical practicum) is completed, the new speech therapist must complete a Speech-Language Pathology Clinical Fellowship Year of at least 36 weeks of full-time clinical practice under the supervision of a certified SLP. They also have to successfully complete a national examination in speech-language pathology. During this time, the speech therapist uses the title CFY-SLP.

Finally, after meeting all these requirements, the speech therapist can use the title CCC-SLP: Certificate of Clinical Competence, Speech-Language Pathologist.

Beyond this, CCC-SLP’s must take 30 hours of continuing education training every three years to maintain their certification.

SLP-A’s are Speech Language Pathologist Assistants. They have taken coursework in the field of speech language pathology, but have not yet earned Master’s degrees. They work under the supervision of a CCC-SLP.

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How do I know if my child needs speech therapy?

Developmental milestones vary. Please refer to our developmental milestones page for specific information. We believe strongly that concerned parents should have an evaluation. Parents often intuitively know when a child’s development is delayed. An evaluation can either show the need for therapy, or put the parent’s mind at ease.

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What happens at an Evaluation?

Evaluations usually last about 50 minutes; this can vary based on the needs of the client. The speech therapist will test articulation (determine which sounds are used and how they are combined), receptive language (understanding what is said), and expressive language (actual communication). They may also look at oral motor development and playskills by observing the child during their interactions or take a language sample, analyzing the grammar and structure of the child’s words.

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What happens during therapy?

Each session is individually designed by the SLP, based on the child’s needs. Activities are selected to meet the goals for the child and help them progress. We believe strongly that therapy should be enjoyable; thus, therapy is usually play-based, with language practice embedded into the play and activities. Often SLP’s will suggest follow-up activities for home to practice what is being learned.

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How do I know if speech therapy is covered by my insurance?

Parents may contact our office, provide insurance information, and give us permission to contact their insurance company regarding eligibility. Parents might also contact their insurance company directly, or consult their plan benefit book.

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My child receives speech therapy at school. Should they have additional services?

If parents are comfortable with their child’s rate of progress, they may not require more services. However, many children do benefit from increased therapy sessions. We do our best to coordinate with school SLP’s to provide optimal services for clients we share.

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